Archive for the ‘Librarianship’ Category

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Trip Participants will travel to Guatemala, visiting school and community libraries in Quetzaltenango and Chajul. Volunteers will complete seven days of work with two partner organizations: the Asturias Academy and Limitless Horizons Ixil. Other trip activities include sightseeing, cultural visits and workshops designed to give participants a comprehensive understanding of libraries, education and culture in Guatemala. This highly immersive experience allows volunteers to provide much needed on-the ground support.

How to apply: submit completed application form to carolyn.doi@lwb-online.org by March 13, 2014. Successful applicants will by notified by the week of March 17.

About our Partner Organizations
The Miguel Angel Asturias Academy is a K-12 non-profit private school in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala. The Academy was founded in 1994 with a goal to eliminate education disparities through subsidized tuition. The Academy’s curriculum is based on the popular education theory of Brazilian educator Paulo Freire, in which systems of injustice are confronted and transformed on the basis of all as teachers and learners.

The Asturias Academy has been working with Librarians Without Borders since 2010, to envision and develop a library within the school. Today, the library is open to students and staff and has just begun lending books for use outside school hours. During the 2014 trip, volunteers will work with library staff to assist with library-related work activities including cataloguing, programming and library maintenance. LWB volunteers will also plan and deliver a series of activities and programs for the Academy students and staff during the annual “Library Day” celebration.

The Saber Sin Límites Chajul Community Library is the first and only community library in the town of Chajul, located in the rural mountainous region of Quiche, Guatemala. With a membership of 1,400 users—ranging in age from four to forty—and counting, 3,783 titles, two librarians, and many helping hands, the library is making reading fun and popular in Chajul. During the service trip, LWB volunteers will have the opportunity to learn about issues related to education and literacy and provide assistance with the children’s library fair.

Housing and Food
Lodging and meals are included in the trip fees. While in Xela, participants will stay at the COFA Catholic Retreat Centre. In Chajul, participants will stay at accommodations provided by Limitless Horizons. Meals will be provided by a local family, or at local restaurants or eateries. Vegetarian options will be available.

Duration April 20 – May 1, 2014

Trip Fees

Program fee* : $800 CAD
Fundraising** : $200 CAD
Total : $1000 CAD

*Program fee includes: lodging, most meals, entrance to all activities and transportation within Guatemala. Volunteers are responsible for cost of flights to and from Guatemala. You are expected to bring extra spending money for additional purchases such as souvenirs and snacks and occasional meals while in Guatemala.
**Fundraising fee will go towards funding projects at the Asturias Academy and Chajul Community Library. This portion is a non-refundable deposit.

Expectations 
All trip volunteers are expected to attend 3 briefing meetings (held online) to discuss projects and receive training on trip projects, prior to departure.

Learn More
A trip information meeting will be held on March 9 (online). Meeting link coming soon.

Questions? Contact: carolyn.doi@lwb-online.org

makerspace intellectual

By spring 2014, the Ottawa Public Library will have its very own public makerspace complete with 3D printers, a laser cutter, a video/photo stage with a green screen and computer pods complete with the latest in video, photo and music editing software. The maker movement has been growing at an increasingly rapid pace and there are already many private or membership based makerspaces popping up in Ottawa. Located in the former circulation workroom at the Nepean Centrepointe branch, OPL’s makerspace will be the first and only fully public making facility in Ottawa. Members of the public will have a safe, comfortable space to collaborate, learn and create unique digital and physical artistic works. This new makerspace will be called Imagine Space.

The Library is pleased to announce that they are working with the Unites States Embassy to bring this space to life. As part of the agreement, the U.S. Embassy has provided funds to purchase equipment, tools, and computers, as well as funding for room preparation and programming. OPL will provide a space and funding for staff to manage and oversee the activities and programs of the makerspace. The agreement is for a one-year pilot.

But… what is a makerspace without people? Besides cool new technology, OPL’s space will feature a variety of programming, seminars and workshops. OPL hopes to recruit a pool of community mentors with expertise in areas such as 3D printing, video and music editing, photography, electronics, robotics, programming, physical arts, crafts, human-computer interaction, video game design, self-publishing and hobbies of every stripe. Much in the same way the Library hosts authors for book readings, our maker space will invite engineers and artists to demonstrate circuit board building or video editing.

5886c46b37511aab92feb6048076643eInterested in 3D printing, robots, crafting, tinkering, engineering, electronics, violin construction or any of the other fun stuff that exists in the world of makerspaces? If so, please give serious consideration to attending this year’s Mini Maker Faire at the Canada Science and Technology Museum. Makerspaces have been appearing in libraries and community centres at an increasingly rapid pace over the past few years. This is a great opportunity for Library employees to get an inside look at a trend that could impact libraries as much as iPads, tablet PCs and eReaders have in the past.

The following excerpt comes courtesy of the Ottawa Mini Maker Faire:

August 31st & September 1st 2013

Located at the Canada Science and Technology Museum
1867 St Laurent Blvd, Ottawa, ON

10AM – 5PM

Free!

The innovation laced through the National Capital Region is impressive, and this third edition of the Ottawa Mini Maker Faire is a chance to connect creative people from all over our region in a celebration of the Do-It-Yourself (DIY) spirit. A Mini Maker Faire brings together families and individuals who celebrate arts, crafts, engineering, food, music, sustainability, and science and those who embrace the DIY spirit. At Mini Maker Faire, the focus is on the process of making – not just the finished product. Follow us on Twitter for updates.

To see what a Mini-Maker Faire is all about, check out our Gallery for photos of the Ottawa Mini Maker Faire 2012 or visit the Ottawa Mini Maker Faire 2010 site HERE.

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Libraries constantly strive to improve their services and communities in new and innovative ways. As library budgets continue to shrink, opportunities to explore new ideas are at risk of being cut to preserve more essential services. Limiting the ability to improve and explore new ideas would undermine libraries’ position to continue to be an important and vital part of our communities. OLA recognizes this and proposes the creation of the OLA Discovery Fund, a fund that would allow libraries to apply for small start up money to explore new and innovative ideas.

The OLA Discovery Fund will act as seed money to begin an innovative idea. As the fund is small, it may not fund the entire project but will aid in getting an idea started. Ideas are not limited to innovation in technology – service innovation, building innovation and other new ideas that push libraries forward are eligible for the fund.

Winners of the OLA Discovery Fund will be required to share their stories. Libraries will thrive by sharing both successes and failures and fund recipients will be required to share their findings with the OLA community.

Participation in the OLA Discovery Fund will not exclude a project from being nominated for other OLA award such as the OLITA Award for Technological Innovation or the Larry Moore Challenge Award.

Please visit the OLA Discovery Fund website for all the details: http://www.accessola.org/OLAWEB/About/Awards/The_OLA_Discovery_Fund.aspx

*All contents above come courtesy of the Ontario Library Association and were originally published here: OLA Discovery Fund 

A few months ago, I was approached by superstar librarians Krista Godfrey and Nick Ruest with an interesting opportunity. They had devised a cunning plan to encourage fellow librarians to break their rusty cages and try something new.  Both are members of the Ontario Library Association‘s OLITA group, otherwise known as the Ontario Library and Information Technology Association. OLITA’s primary focus is to foster the promotion and innovative use of emerging technologies in library settings. Together, we’ve created the OLA Discovery Fund, an award designed to provide seed money to help launch interesting and innovative library projects. We’re awarding up to $500  each for the best, most unique and creative ideas. If you work in the information field, and have an idea that you can’t wait to try, read on…

The text below comes courtesy of the Ontario Library Association website. You can see the original and apply for the award by clicking here –> OLA Discovery Fund

Background

Libraries constantly strive to improve their services and communities in new and innovative ways. As library budgets continue to shrink, opportunities to explore new ideas are at risk of being cut to preserve more essential services. Limiting the ability to improve and explore new ideas would undermine libraries’ position to continue to be an important and vital part of our communities. OLA recognizes this and proposes the creation of the OLA Discovery Fund, a fund that would allow libraries to apply for small start up money to explore new and innovative ideas.

The OLA Discovery Fund will act as seed money to begin an innovative idea. As the fund is small, it may not fund the entire project but will aid in getting an idea started. Ideas are not limited to innovation in technology – service innovation, building innovation and other new ideas that push libraries forward are eligible for the fund.

Winners of the OLA Discovery Fund will be required to share their stories. Libraries will thrive by sharing both successes and failures and fund recipients will be required to share their findings with the OLA community.

Participation in the OLA Discovery Fund will not exclude a project from being nominated for other OLA award such as the OLITA Award for Technological Innovation or the Larry Moore Challenge Award.

Process

Application
Applicants (OLA Members) can apply to fund at anytime during the year. Awards will be given out 3 times a year, with a maximum of $500 per award.

Winner Responsibilities
Projects funded by the OLA Discovery Fund will be required to share their findings, whether
they succeed or fail. The project should be shared via OLA communications such as the OLA
website or Access magazine within a year of receiving the fund money.

Committee Responsibilities
An OLA Discovery Fund committee will be responsible for accepting and reviewing nominations.

Timelines
Awards will be given out August 1, and December 1 of each year.

Application & Review Process

  • Media: Participants shall apply online. Participants must provide full contact information (name, position, organization and relevant contact info such as email/phone).
  • Organizer: OLA Discovery Fund committee, a sub-group of OLITA.
  • Task/ Topic specificity The fund will act as seed money to launch or test an innovative idea.
  • Degree of elaboration Participants will submit a brief 500-1000 word summary of their proposal. The proposal should include a description of the idea, the need/problem it addresses, the manner in which it will address this need/problem, why it is innovative, a brief explanation of how the $500 award will be spent and a brief explanation of how project goals will be accomplished.
  • Target group: Individual OLA members, OLA member libraries.
  • Participation: Participants may apply individually, as formal groups (representing formal organizations) or as informal groups of individuals. Participants must be OLA members in good standing to apply.
  • Contest period: Three awards of approximately $500 each will be awarded per year at intervals of approximately four months. Each participant shall be eligible for a maximum of one award per year.
  • Reward/ motivation: A monetary award of $500, the opportunity to gain positive publicity via OLA communications infrastructure (website, Access Magazine, Super Conference etc.), the opportunity to launch a project that will return tangible benefits to the participant.
  • Community functionality Award recipients will be required to communicate their experiences directly to the OLA Discovery Fund committee. Any communications may be used as the committee sees fit. Recipients may also be required to communicate their experiences via other channels (website, Access Magazine, Super Conference etc…).
  • Evaluation: Applications shall be judged by the OLA Discovery Fund committee. Applications will be judged on uniqueness of idea, the idea’s potential to deliver benefits, feasibility/usefulness of the idea.

What is 3D Printing?

3D printing, or additive manufacturing, is the process of making solid objects from digital files. A printer is used to melt down raw materials such as plastics, metal alloys or synthetic silk-like substances. The printer then deposits the raw material onto a platform in much the same way a traditional printer deposits ink onto a sheet of paper. The 3D printer continues to deposit the material in successive layers, building upwards until a real, solid object has been built. Instead of printing a picture of a coffee mug, you can print a real, usable mug and take it with you.

What Can I Make with my 3D Printer?

This depends on the size of your printer, budget and your ability to design. In 2004 Audi created a concept car manufactured in large part by 3D printers. The Audi RSQ was featured prominently in the sci-fi film I, Robot. In 2011, a group of Canadian engineers created the “Urbee”, the world’s first 100% 3D printed car. Archaeologists and museums can scan and replicate fragile cultural relics – imagine being able to reconstruct a duplicate Rosetta Stone without ever endangering the original artifact. Researchers at Cornell University have even used bio-printers to create replacement ears for burn victims and artificial heart valves.

While smaller, non-industrial printers certainly won’t have the ability to manufacture entire vehicles, the types of items they can produce is vast. It’s easy to make figurines, toys & puzzles, replacement parts for household items, mobile phone cases, robots, sunglasses, kitchen utensils – just about anything smaller than a loaf of bread.  The best part is 3D printers are self-replicating. They can be easily used to print parts to build more 3D printers.

Users can download pre-designed objects from websites such as Thingiverse, design their own objects or scan and replicate real-life objects.

3D Printing in Libraries

In recent years public libraries have been evolving from “warehouses with books” to a more community based model. Libraries have become vibrant communities where people meet, socialize, learn, collaborate and create. Regardless of whether you call them hacker spaces, fab labs or maker zones, hobbyist communities are popping up in libraries all across North America.

Just as the Internet democratized access to information, 3D printing technology has the potential to democratize access to the manufacture of goods. With the Internet, the average person has the ability to create and spread information without having to rely on large media companies. 3D printers will allow us to create and share physical items without the reliance on assembly lines or factories. Libraries have always been engines of democracy, and as a progressive, forward thinking organizations they are perfect vehicles to help introduce this emerging technology.

MakerBot Details

While there are other models out there, here are some specs on one of the more popular (and affordable) 3D printers.

Website: http://www.makerbot.com/

  • Cost: $1999 USD
  • Delivery: Comes fully assembled in 10-12 weeks
  • Includes: MakerBot printer w/ double extrusions (prints in two colours simultaneously), two 1KG spools of ABS plastic
  • Features: LCD control panel (controls the printer w/o need for a separate PC), SD card slot to upload schematics and object designs, print volume of 300 cubic inches (about the size of a loaf of bread)
  • Shipping Weight: 32 lbs.
*Audi RSQ, Rosetta Stone images courtesy of Wikipedia. Other images from Makerbot.com and Thingiverse.com.

ImageLibrarians without Borders has received a generous donation from one of the Ottawa Public Library‘s (OPL) Teen Advisory Groups (TAG). Based out of OPL’s Centennial branch, this group of socially conscious teens raised $175 to help support the literacy needs of students a half a world away.

Being heavy users and supporters of the Library, TAG members realised how big a hole their own lives would have if they did not have a library. They wanted to help other teens experience their love of books and the sense of community a library brings. On November 19th/2011, Centennial TAG held a two hour bake sale with contributions from TAG members, Centennial staff, and generous Centennial branch customers. In that short period of time, their community supported TAG’s efforts by purchasing $175 worth of cookies, tarts, and cupcakes! OPL’s customers, being huge supporters of the Library, were eager to chip in.

The donation will be put towards the Asturias Librarian Stipend Fund.  The financial resources we gather will help bring a librarian to the Miguel Angel Asturias Academy Library in Xela, Guatemala. The presence of a full-time librarian will help the Academy supply the quality books and programming students need in order to learn.

On behalf of LWB and the Asturias Academy, thanks to the Centennial branch teens for reaching out! Special thanks to Andrea Gowing, the OPL staff member who facilitates the group.